It’s last week’s news at this point, but the music branch of the Academy ruled Randy Newman’s score for The Princess and the Frog ineligible for Best Original Score. The branched cited the rule that a score cannot be “diminished on impact by the predominant use of songs.” Apparently all the original music for this musical had too many lyrics on top of it.

I’m not here to comment on the legitimacy of the rule. I understand it despite its awkwardness. And, while I’ve heard the film’s Oscar-eligible original songs, I haven’t seen it nor listened to its score. I liked the songs and I imagine at least one will get a nomination.

What’s troubling is the inconsistency. I rewatched Slumdog Millionaire this week. (Incidentally, I really enjoyed it, which surprised me. I liked it a lot the first time through but had sort of already consigned it to the “underwhelming Oscar winner” category.) I’m very familiar with its terrific, multiple Oscar-winning music and fully enjoyed its pulsating beats. But almost every piece is a song! And not just a piece with some vocal elements, but a full on song with meaningful lyrics! How in the world was this eligible?

In 2007, Eddie Vedder’s wonderful score to Into the Wild ran afoul of the same rule and I wouldn’t call that film any more song-centric than Slumdog. Ditto for Karen O and Carter Burwell’s music for Where the Wild Things Are this year. Crazy Heart didn’t even bother to submit due to the song restrictions.

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