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Looking at film years from a high level always interests me and 2010 provided an interesting contrast to 2009. The latter had a good number of movies I loved but was light in quality beyond the very top films. By November I was talking about how 2010 was already better than 2009. I actually pondered making this a top 15 list since the quality was so high in my mind… until it came time to actually make the list. It turns out there was a lot I liked but not an especially large amount that I was passionate about. So kind of the exact opposite of 2009.

In the end, there are two films I loved and a good number I really liked.

1. Inception. Clever, entertaining, and bad-ass. I suppose I sound like every other internet nerd when I slobber all over this film, but Christopher Nolan is the master at mixing traditional blockbuster elements with thought-provoking topics. Part of what’s so great about Inception is how brashly original it is. It’s pretty much like nothing that’s been done, which makes it all the more astonishing. A year later, it still feels so complete. How is a plot so clever, original, and complex so airtight? I feel like we’ll be talking about this one for years.

2. The Social Network. This has just about everything you could ask for in a film. It has a compelling plot, it’s technically brilliant from the camerawork and score to the acting, and it’s wonderfully atmospheric and thematically resonant. The second time I saw it the ending snuck up on me and I was very sad that it was over. I think too many people want it to be a movie about a generation since it’s about a technology that defines a generation. But it’s not. It’s about relationships and ambition and how they can be at odds – and it’s damn good at it.

3. Get Low. This is just a delightful film. To some extent it’s hard to explain the joy I felt watching this. It’s a mix of an interesting premise, terrific characters, and some wonderful acting. Robert Duvall stars as a hermit in the 1940s who decides to return to public life by throwing himself his own funeral. Bill Murray is fantastic as the funeral director that Duvall hires. Sissy Spacek plays an old flame of Duvall’s. It’s a film about regret, but doesn’t overtly dwell on it. Its lack of awards season traction is the disappointment of the year for me.

4. Carlos. Here is a film that can succeed because of its length. At about six hours long – it has also been released as a TV miniseries – it really has time to make a deep dive into its subject. Carlos is “The Jackal,” the famed terrorist from the 1960 and 70s. At the beginning of the film, Carlos is a fit, idealistic young man that turns to violence for his conception of revolution. By the end, he’s a chubby has-been living off the generosity of unsavory friends. The journey from one to the other is all the fun. And, best of all, we spend enough time with Carlos that we understand the whys behind it all. Despite its six hour runtime it almost never drags and includes some long, involved action scenes of Carlos’s plots.

5. Exit Through the Gift Shop. This is the second documentary on my top ten lists about the natures of art and nonfiction film (see 2007’s My Kid Could Paint That). These are certainly themes that resonate with me. This is a film about the anarchic world of street art, just to have the camera turned back on the original director to question his role and what makes something “art” and not mere derivative. While leaving you with plenty to ponder (including “what just happened??”), it’s also terrifically entertaining.

6. Restrepo. Co-director Tim Hetherington was killed in Libya this year. This guy was the real deal and the film he shot is as well. He and collaborator Sebastian Junger have incredible access while embedded with an infantry unit stationed at an isolated outpost in Afghanistan. If there’s any film that shows you what it’s like to be in the war in Afghanistan, this is it. The battle scenes are chaotic and immersive, but it also gives insight to the human experience of fighting this war: the emotional toll, the adrenaline rush, the camaraderie, the grief of losing a friend. It also gives a sense of the futility of the mission and the mistakes made earlier in the war that we’re still paying for.

7. Green Zone. To me, this is a great mix of action and political thriller. I like my shootout sequences balanced with compelling intrigue. While it’s certainly preaching to the choir with me, the politics got me appropriately angered and I liked that it included real-life events from the occupation of Iraq, such as the disastrous debaathification of the Iraqi government. I don’t deny it has a few issues (see my earlier post for more) but I found this a thrilling ride.

8. Catfish. Forget The Social Network. This is the film that takes a microscope to what it means to be alive in today’s electronically connected world. Two friends turn their cameras on another friend as he embarks on a relationship with a girl he met online. Things don’t develop according to plan. It’s interesting to me that a story ostensibly about online romance reveals so much about true human emotion and imperfection. If you caught the marketing campaign for it and came away thinking it was some sort of horror documentary, forget you ever saw that. It has several taut moments but it’s more likely to leave you heartbroken than saddened.

9. The House of Branching Love. I’m not sure this Finnish film really counts because it never got a U.S. release. I saw it at the 2010 Film Fest DC and it’s managed to hang around in my head. It’s too bad I can’t figure out how to watch it again as it never got a DVD release here in the U.S.

The madcap plot is centered around a middle aged couple who decides to break up but remain living in the same house. They agree not to bring dates home, but that rule is quickly broken. Plus there are gangsters, goofy cops, misunderstandings galore, and plenty of hijinks. It’s just very funny and a lot of fun with a few delightfully dark touches.

9.1. Fair Game. This is my replacement number nine while considering only films released  in the U.S. in 2010. A telling of the Valerie Plame affair, Fair Game is a nice mix of political and domestic dramas. Naomi Watts and particularly Sean Penn give very good performances. It’s an engrossing film that really does a good job bringing home the outrage of the whole situation without getting too preachy.

10. Kick-Ass. I saw this appear on several year-end top ten lists… and a lot of worst ten lists. I can understand how some people found a film featuring a foul-mouthed pre-teen girl massacring dozens of people morally reprehensible. But to me it’s a stylish and original film that was quite enjoyable to watch. It doesn’t have anything special to say, but it feels fresh and entertained me greatly.

As for some other films that were in contention for this list: The Secret in Their Eyes is an entertaining police melodrama where Argentina and its recent history is a central character. The Foreign Language Oscar winner has interesting characters and a stylish look… A film it beat out for the Oscar, France’s A Prophet, is an intense crime drama with the ability to leave a lasting, if sometimes disturbing, impression… The intensity of Black Swan is quite the head trip.

I think this site is the world’s biggest proponent of She’s Out of My League, a comedy with good jokes and entertaining characters… Daddy Longlegs was the Independent Spirit surprise of the year for me. It’s a very small budget drama about a father who means well, but is really not a good father. Ronald Bornstein is great in the lead role. To his – and the film’s – credit, it is quite watchable despite its stable of unlikeable characters… Unstoppable is simply a great time as Denzel does his thing. It’s also interesting to see an action film without any real bad guys (except physics).

Four Lions is the terrorism comedy of the year, following four inept Brits as they attempt to wage jihad. The climax as they try to put their plan into action is hilarious and memorable… The Special Relationship takes what could be a dry topic (the friendship between Tony Blair and Bill Clinton) and turns it into an enjoyable romp through recent history, skipping around to important events.

Some other prizes:

Worst Film of the Year: Life During Wartime. I kind of can’t believe this movie exists. If you feel like your movie experiences have been lacking in boring and ridiculous ruminations on molestation and suicide, then this is the film for you. My runners-up are also Independent Spirit nominees: Greenberg and Jack Goes Boating. What was the deal with the Spirits?

Shots of the Year: I choose two similar shots as my shots of the year, one starting wide and zooming into its subject and the other doing the opposite. In The Secret in Their Eyes, a shot begins from above a soccer stadium. It swoops into the stadium, over the field, and into the stands where the two policemen are looking for a suspect. As they push their way through the crowd, their suspect runs and the police and camera follow. The shot continues for five and a half unbroken minutes and its audacity is a delight. Check out the scene here (caution: auto-play) along with the techniques behind how they pulled it off.

In The Illusionist, our shot begins tight on the magician and his rabbit on a hill. The shot swirls upwards, first revealing a hill covered with rabbits before panning through and over the cityscape of Edinburgh. It’s already an incredibly gorgeous film and that shot literally made me flinch. Its effect was better than anything I’ve seen in a 3D animated film.

Surprises of the Year (Good): Tron: Legacy is bad ass. Sort of incoherent, sure, but a bit better treatment of the terrific Tron premise than the original and with an awesome look. The score is also wonderful… I couldn’t have been less excited about Conviction but it’s surprisingly effective featuring a very good performance from Hillary Swank… I mocked The King’s Speech in our first season preview for what seemed to be a boring premise, but hell if it isn’t entertaining and moving.

Whoops

Surprises of the Year (Bad): I thought a political comedy featuring the talents of Kevin Spacey would appeal to me if no one else, but Casino Jack turned out to be a complete mess tonally… Megamind had been on my radar for ages as a premise of a supervillain looking for meaning in his life after vanquishing his superhero foe. Too bad it doesn’t live up to that clever premise and it has a serious lack of humor.

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The Grouches are Independent Spirit Awards voters this year. That is, combined we are ONE voter under Jared’s name. It costs like $90, you think each of us are going to pony that up?

Besides, merging our four formidable minds into one blob of consensus allows us to devise a complex voting system that makes us to compete for our individual opinions to be heard.

Essentially we each earned points by seeing all films nominated in a category. We can allocate those points to any category so we can – and do! – waste whole bunches of points to ensure our favorites win. For a few categories only one of us saw all the nominees and that person got to choose the winner.

We gathered online the other night to reveal our votes.

BEST FIRST FEATURE

The nominees:

  • Everything Strange and New, about a man who feels trapped in his life by his wife and kids
  • Get Low, following a hermit who decides to throw his own funeral party while he is still alive
  • The Last Exorcism, a “documentary” following a reverend who wants to show the sham of exorcisms
  • Night Catches Us, a drama set in the aftermath of a betrayal in the Philadelphia Black Panther community
  • Tiny Furniture, a semi-autobiographical film about a woman who returns home from college unsure what to do with her life.

WINNER: Get Low

John: My sole vote goes to Get Low, which shouldn’t be a big surprise. I’ll be interested to see what you all think about it should you see it. I don’t know if this is another one of those movies I love and everyone hates or not. It’s amusing and heartfelt. Robert Duvall and Bill Murray are great.

Brian: I look forward to seeing that movie and once again wondering if we saw the same film, like Green Zone.

Jared: I saw all the other films in that category, and I don’t think it is going to take too much for me to agree with you on this choice

John:  If these directors are the future of movies, are you looking forward to the future?

Brian: Having been rather meh on Tiny Furniture, I’m still looking forward to Lena Dunham’s future. I think she has talent — I’d like to see what she can do when it’s not starring her family.

Jared: Adam and I saw Dunham’s actual first feature.  I think she needs to break free from biographical stuff before she really can find her voice. I think working with Apatow could do wonders for her

John: I agree, Tiny Furniture was okay but I’ll probably check out her future work. The Last Exorcism is a pretty straight horror flick but it very effectively got under my skin. If they do some non-horror stuff I’d be interested. Night Catches Us was a very nice period piece. And Everything Strange and New… what would you say about that, Jared?

Jared: I watched that film last night and while I didn’t like it, I think I’m going to rate it higher than you did. That said, I can’t really imagine watching another film from the director. At some point, you just can’t substitute voiceover for actual plot.

John: It’s boring and exasperating. And highlights a common theme of the Independent Spirits this year: Moping.

Brian: This year? Isn’t that sort of the point of independent films?

John: It does take some bizarre turns at the end which are interesting, but also sort of awful and ridiculous. It also has plenty of sad clowns. For real!

Jared: Of the group, I’d probably say the people behind Night Catches Us have the most potential…with some refining and a little less reliance on those archival clips, I think they could really make some interesting films

John: And I feel like The Last Exorcism doesn’t get a great rep in the horror genre. I think I liked it just because it got to me, but I hardly ever watch horror.

Jared: It seemed like standard fare to me

BEST SUPPORTING FEMALE

The nominees:

  • Ashley Bell, The Last Exorcist
  • Dale Dickey, Winter’s Bone
  • Allison Janney, Life During Wartime
  • Daphne Rubin-Vega, Jack Goes Boating
  • Naomi Watts, Mother and Child

WINNER: Dale Dickey (13 points – 8 from Jared, 5 from John)

Jared: Well, sadly, we wasted a lot of points here

John: I considered that you might not give points to anyone else, but I wanted to make sure she had enough in case you for some reason chose Naomi Watts

Jared: Not going to lie, my strategy wasn’t all that different. I was surprised to see Watts here, considering her character is virtually emotionless.

John: I also considered tossing a few to Ashley Bell just in case. Watts could also be considered lead.

Jared: Yeah, Ashley Bell was my runner-up, but again, I don’t think she added anything new to the horror genre. I wouldn’t consider Watts lead, personally.

John: Bell is appropriately creepy as a possessed girl. But this category was more or less a Dickey win by default. She’s good; I might have seen her as an Oscar nominee. But the rest really didn’t do much for me. Dale Dickey is quite memorable. I don’t want to tarnish her work here. But there wasn’t much competition.

Jared: A good summation, I think. I found her just as memorable as John Hawkes and found it unfortunate she couldn’t get much awards traction.

John: To be fair to Allison Janney, what do you do with that material? So, who else could be here? Cyrus is up the Independent Spirit wheelhouse, but no nomination for Marisa Tomei?? That movie flat out fails without her.

Brian: that was rather surprising

Jared: Where was Mila Kunis? I also liked Julianna Margulies in City Island and Rebecca Hall in Please Give

Brian: yes! Mila Kunis of course

Adam: Mila Kunis is ALWAYS a good decision

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

  • Black Swan
  • Greenberg
  • Never Let Me Go
  • Tiny Furniture
  • Winter’s Bone

WINNER: Black Swan (4 points – John)
Other votes: Winter’s Bone (3 points – 2 from Jared, 1 from Brian)
Never Let Me Go (2 points – Brian)

Brian: Booooo. Really, John? Explain yourself.

Adam: Agreed. As usual, John makes a HORRIBLE decision. I am starting to think John doesn’t actually watch the same movies as everyone else.

John: Black Swan gets so much energy from the camerawork!

Brian: The dance was horribly shot because Natalie Portman had to use a body double

Adam: Moving the camera around a lot does not equate to “energy”

John: It puts the viewer into the descent into madness! I also considered Winter’s Bone.  What was special about Never Let Me Go?

Brian: Since no one else voted for it, I’ll give some dap to Never Let Me Go. As we discussed last fall, it had a lot of flaws, but the bleak cinematography really gave us a sense of place and added the dystopian feel of the English countryside. Cinematography was easily the best part of that film and the most memorable.

John: Is that cinematography or a combination of set decoration and pretty scenery?

Brian: I believe reading at the time that they used specific filters

Adam: Is the camera work in Black Swan due to cinematography or editing?

Brian: Or directing?

John: All of the above.

BEST SUPPORTING MALE

  • Bill Murray, Get Low
  • John Hawkes, Winter’s Bone
  • Samuel L. Jackson, Mother and Child
  • John Ortiz, Jack Goes Boating
  • Mark Ruffalo, The Kids Are All Right

The votes are all mine!

WINNER: Bill Murray

John: My sole vote goes to Bill Murray

Brian: Shocker. How close were Hawkes and Ruffalo?

John: I really like Murray here. He plays something of a sleazeball funeral home owner and is appropriately funny and smarmy, but also hits the serious notes just right. If this was a competitive category, I might have tossed some points to Hawkes to cover my bases. I really liked him. And I dug Ruffalo as well. So a good top three in that category.

Jared: I also saw four of these films. I think we can agree that Samuel L. Jackson has no business being here, and Jack Goes Boating was so unwatchable, it is hard to tell if John Ortiz was any good. I slightly favor Ruffalo over Hawkes this year, but you can’t go wrong with either, so Murray must have been really great.

John: The movie just connected with me, and the movie is all on Duvall and Murray

Brian: Hawkes really took over the second half of Winter’s Bone — and took care of much of the boredom of the first half.

John: Any snubs stand out here? Since Jackson is such a nothing nom?

Brian: Oliver Platt for Please Give? I could buy it

Jared: Vincent Cassel (Black Swan)

John: True. Strange that Please Give got a casting award but no other acting nominations. Also, Vincent Cassel is a good choice.

Jared: I got the John seal of approval! I also liked Michael Shannon in The Runaways for supporting male.

BEST SCREENPLAY

  • The Kids Are All Right
  • Life During Wartime
  • Please Give
  • Rabbit Hole
  • Winter’s Bone

WINNER:  Please Give (10 points – 5 from Jared, 5 from Brian)
Other votes: Winter’s Bone (4 points – John)

Brian: wooot

John: I kept knocking down points on this one, figuring that my votes would go for naught here

Brian: I knew Jared and my combined points would get us over. I just didnt know how low to go.

Jared: Game theory!

John: I found Please Give pretty bland

Jared: That might be because you don’t have a sense of humor.

Adam: Or taste in movies

John: Good performances. The casting award was probably a good choice.

Brian: For me, it was an exceptional character study. I like ships passing in the night films, and Please Give was no exception to that rule. And for some reason or other, I’m a sucker for old people dying films.

Jared: I found the script to be witty and populated with interesting characters, plus a plot that kept my attention.

Adam: hmm…Jared thought the script was good. The one thing in a movie he actually pays attention to. I feel it is probably a better than even chance I’d at least appreciate the movie

John: Parts of it I liked and some of the characters/relationships. But then it ended and I was like, “shrug.” It may be that we spend so much time with Catherine Keener when she wasn’t interesting and everyone else was.

Brian: Take that back!

Jared: You need a good straight man to highlight the quirks of other people. I don’t think it is supposed to reveal any hidden mysteries of mankind.

Brian: John, what did you like about Winter’s Bone screenplay because I found that to be one of its weaker points.

John: I liked the plot, setting, and characters in Winter’s Bone. They’re all understated, but all compelling. But this also got my votes since nothing else in the category did much for me. Winter’s Bone is a pretty plot-driven movie. It has a lot more of a story than Please Give. I considered Rabbit Hole too, but that script is uneven. I loved certain parts to it and disliked others.

Jared: Rabbit Hole has a surprisingly strong script. It wasn’t great, to be sure, but it was definitely compelling in a way that many other adaptations of plays are not.

John: Like, the whole relationship between Nicole Kidman and the boy felt weird and forced to me. But some of their conversations are terrific.

Brian: I think that was sort of the point

John: For a movie that seemed to try to be quite realist, that relationship felt too cinematic. Like a thing that would only happen that way in movies. Though I felt similarly about a lot of the over-arching plot threads. Not so great at a macro level, but many great individual scenes

Brian: I liked how we were introduced to the boy in that we didn’t really know who he was or why Kidman was stalking him until about 10-15 mins after we met him. The pay-off worked. And the scene with Dianne Wiest and Nicole Kidman was the best of them all. I probably would have voted for it had it not been for Please Give

John: I really liked the scene that gives Rabbit Hole its name

Jared: Same here.

John: Also the scene in the boy’s bedroom. I could list many. But put them all together and it’s like, “another scene where Nicole Kidman says something socially awkward??”

Jared: We can’t move on before discussing Life During Wartime!

Brian: Hahahahaha. Oh man, I really really wish Adam had seen this

John: Absolutely atrocious movie. And the writing is the worst part!

Jared: I will give it credit for its consistency…granted, it is consistently unbearable, but still

Adam: I feel like I have seen enough horrible movies because of you all

Brian: I’ve blocked out most of LDW, but anyone want to reminisce their favorite worst parts?

John: I think Life During Wartime was not as awful as Greenberg because at least LDW had a WTF element that makes you wonder what the hell could possibly happen next. Also: MOPE! MOPEY MOPE MOPE

Jared: haha

John: (plus molestation and suicide)

Jared: and sexual harassment

Brian: and Pee-Wee Herman coming back from the dead!

John: I’m not sure there’s any part I didn’t dislike

Coming up later: the lead actor, director, and best picture categories!

Nominations are up and we have a lot to chew on for the next few weeks.

The John vs Jared prediction contest came right down to the wire with me eking it out, 83-82. For perfect categories, Jared nailed Animated Feature while I got Picture, Original Screenplay, Sound Editing, and Makeup. But both of us did quite well in other categories, usually only missing one. A common pattern was us picking the same slate except for one in a given category with both of our dissenting picks correct and one common pick incorrect.

We got two of three of our biggest wishes, just one of our outlandish picks hit, and no luck on our technical category hopes, but one of our anticipated disappointing locks failed to materialize.

Beyond that, how are the Grouches feeling today?

Jared:

I suppose after all that buildup, feeling a little let down by the nominations is inevitable.  On first glance, I see a few themes to this year’s crop.  There weren’t really any major surprises.  Yeah, Waiting for Superman felt like a frontrunnner, but the documentary branch is a notoriously hard one to pin down.  I’m not sure anyone guessed Nolan would miss a director’s nod, but he’s clearly yet to be completely accepted by the Academy.  Perhaps the biggest questions is whether The Social Network is still the favorite to win Best Picture, since The King’s Speech tallied more nominations.  I’m a little hesitant to go there yet, because the only category in which the Facebook movie really missed was supporting actor, but Garfield was never a shoo-in and we already knew that The King’s Speech had the more widely respected actors.  Otherwise, I’m happy, of course, that Hawkes and Ruffalo both received nominations.  And looking forward to slicing and dicing these things up with you guys over the next month.

Brian:

I too am looking forward to debating these categories with you all as well. I’m pretty disappointed about Inception missing director and editing, yet somehow still getting a screenplay nomination. If any of those three deserved to be left out, it was Nolan’s writing that often verged on psychobabble. I probably would have gone to the mat pushing a Nolan win for directing, but now I won’t have the chance.

The Social Network vs. King’s Speech fight will be a lot of fun to analyze and look at, as prognosticators will call the race closer than it likely is in order to spruce up interest in the evening. Consider me pleased that The Town got overlooked it most every category but supporting actor, and I’m even willing to let that slide with John Hawkes popping up as one of the few surprises of the morning.

Looks like we have a few more movies to add to our list, fellas.

John:

I’m a bit bummed about a shut out for Get Low but there aren’t many egregious choices and I’m pleasantly happy with a way a few of the races broke. I’m surprised at how few films got nominations in major categories: just 16. The last three years saw 19, 18, and 21, respectively. Maybe the ten Best Picture nominees aren’t inviting anyone new to the party.

And, despite Brian’s claim above, there’s not much left to see!

Oscar nominations arrive Tuesday, January 25. To prepare, we’re giving you our sharpest insight and predictions. Our last topic: what are you most hoping will happen tomorrow? If you’re reading this Tuesday, give your favorite Grouch a high five or a supportive pat on the back, depending on what happens.

Brian: Reznor needs to score

Only in the fantastical world of the Oscars would it be possible for a nominee to be just on the edge of being recognized yet should it get nominated, be a favorite for win. That’s the general consensus around Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross’ score for The Social Network. Having already won the Golden Globe for Best Score, you’d think this is a shoo-in. But you’d be wrong. It’s rather astonishing and remarkable that such a simple series of 6 notes could be so evocative. Listening to it while writing this post, I could visualize so much of the film in my head. Like Sorkin and Fincher’s portrayal of Zuckerberg, the score is isolating and contemplative, not to mention brilliant.

Honorable mention: Please Give for Best Original Screenplay. My hobby horse for the year — great storytelling with subtle character development. More to come from me on this one.

John: A Duvall-less Oscars would make me Low

I didn’t have a pet cause this season until right at the last minute. That cause is Get Low, a delightful and touching drama with a nice comedic streak. Robert Duvall gives a wonderful, subtle performance. He’s on the bubble for a Best Actor nomination and I’m rooting hard for him. (I also hold out very small hope for Bill Murray.)

On some smaller notes, I’m rooting for Eddie Vedder to finally land a Best Song nod, this time for “Better Days” from Eat, Pray, Love. It’s actually not a very good song, but… Eddie Vedder! Cmon!

Finally, I just want an out of left field surprise (provided it doesn’t push out a favorite of mine) and/or some better-than-expected love for some smaller films like Another Year.

Jared: Snub Hawkes and I’ll have a Bone to pick with the Academy

I think the other Grouches will agree that this year it is difficult to find too much to root for, nomination-wise.  Films and performances I loved are either safely in the club or so far off the radar that there’s really no chance at all to pick up a nomination.

Still, what fun is this if you can’t root for something?  When I first heard a few months ago someone suggesting that John Hawkes could nab an Oscar nomination, I laughed it off, thinking the person was probably just a huge Winter’s Bone fan forgetting the crush of performances that would enter the fray come Oscar season.  And Hawkes almost didn’t factor into awards season.  Except for getting a SAG nomination.  Which has to establish him as a viable contender, given the frequent overlap between the SAGs and the Oscars.  Hawkes’s role may not be as showy as Bale’s, on the nose as Renner’s, or have the screen time of Rush’s, but his performance is incredibly memorable nonetheless.  Yeah, it would be nice to give someone his first nomination and share some indie love.  But more than that, it’d be nice to recognize a performance that I believe really is one of the best of the year, name recognition be damned.

(As a side note, I’m not hoping for Hawkes as the expense of Ruffalo.  And the thing that would conceivably make me the happiest is a screenplay nom for How to Train Your Dragon, but that seems a little more remote.)

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