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The Oscars are quickly approaching. Because we’ve spent the time to see the nominees and because we’re really smart (and I, at least, have impeccable taste), we’re telling you what should win in all the categories.

The nominees are:

  • Michael Haneke, Amour
  • Quentin Tarantino, Django Unchained
  • John Gatins, Flight
  • Wes Anderson & Roman Coppola, Moonrise Kingdom
  • Mark Boal, Zero Dark Thirty

John

This is another tough category for me. It contains a number of films I admire but trying to pick the best writing achievement from them is a hard proposition.

Amour is at the bottom of the pile for me. For those that love the movie, what do they love? The story? The dialogue? The character arcs? No, it’s probably the performances, the shot choices, the pace, and Haneke’s visual style. So vote for him for Best Director.

The problem with Zero Dark Thirty is not torture, per se. All the political hand-wringing about whether it condones torture is overblown. I don’t think it has any duty to explicitly show the downsides of torture (though it is pretty explicit about its horrors). But I think it may have been a better movie if it had. I found the story to be distressingly linear. The key to finding Bin Laden gets discovered very early in the film and much of the rest of the story relentlessly follows that lead, overly simplifying a fascinatingly complex process. Yesterday, Jeff Wells published a response from someone connected to ZDT to yet another editorial about the film. He argues that the film does show the inefficiencies of torture and the years of false starts, but cites literally two lines of dialogue to back that up. I just think the film could have been richer; the film mostly left me with a desire to read a book on the subject to get a more complete view of it. One other script quibble I have is that the film diverts to show literally every major terror attack after 9/11, presumably to add some explosions to the film.

Django Unchained is my favorite film in this category. My favorite film nominated in any category, in fact. Tarantino has made an immensely entertaining film, which is a compliment coming from me as someone who has never fully been on the Tarantino bandwagon. But while I enjoyed the story and the dialogue, all the other elements are what make it so great. The shots, the music, the visual flourishes. There’s no doubt Tarantino “authored” this movie’s success, but in the sense that I’d vote for him for Best Director. (Plus the story tends to meander a bit. People say he needs an editor to cut down on bloated runtime but I think he needs some help tightening up the scripts as well.) I could say the similar things about Moonrise Kingdom. Interesting characters and story but non-script elements make it special.

John Gatins

John Gatins

This leaves Flight, which I think is the movie whose success is most fueled by its script. It takes a story about alcoholism in a creative and compelling direction. Whip Whitaker is a fantastic and complex character. The script also injects some levity into the story, keeping it from getting too bogged down in dreariness. Denzel Washington’s performance and a harrowingly-realized plane crash are other important elements, but a lot of the film’s success started on the page.

Still, if I’m being honest, I’m rooting for Django or Moonrise so that one of them can win something.

What should have been here? I really had high hopes for Looper and it’s a shame it didn’t make it.

Jared

I get on Wes Anderson’s case a lot and I don’t regret any of it. However, his script with Roman Coppola for Moonrise Kingdom does have a lot of sweet moments. The quirkiness gets in the way of everything, but underneath is a touching story of first love and adolescence and being an adult and lots more interesting stuff.

The events of Amour are…”mundane” might be the wrong word, but they are largely commonplace. Which isn’t necessarily an obstacle to making an engaging movie, but throughout Michael Haneke’s whole script I felt like I was watching someone’s home videos. I understand that’s an appealing quality for some people, but I didn’t see the point.

The next three are among my favorite original screenplays of the year. Mark Boal’s script is part procedural and part action thriller. Perhaps unsurprisingly I prefer the latter. The first part of the movie is less remarkable, but it slowly builds to an epic climax. Boal seems really in his element writing tense war action, and maybe a little less confident in the investigation side of things.

I still maintain that Quentin Tarantino would benefit from an editor of some sort to tighten up and slim down his films. But not too much, because there’s a lot of fantastic stuff in there. Tarantino has an absolutely wicked sense of comic relief, the scene with the hoods may be one of the funniest of the year. But like the gruesome shootout at the end (which may be one of the best showdowns of the year), I question how they fit into the movie as a whole.

Great characters start on the page

Great characters start on the page

I was absolutely thrilled to see John Gatins get a nomination here. I thought he had two major roadblocks in his way: the fantastic crash sequence and the stellar work of Denzel Washington. Both of which, of course, stem from the fantastic screenplay. The story is well-plotted and the main character is fascinating. From hotel bed of sin to plane crash to hospital to farm to hearing, the film is always riveting, exquisitely paced, and thought-provoking.

Should have been here: I’d keep Boal, Tarantino, and Gatins. And I’d throw in David Wain and Ken Marino, Wanderlust and Seth MacFarlane, Alec Sulkin, and Wellesley Wild, Ted.

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Brian and I closed out our day of movies with Moonrise Kingdom.  But not before cracking open some nice whiskey.  Which I certainly needed, because I really can’t stand Wes Anderson.

Anderson’s distinctive style is omnipresent From the dialogue to the set decoration to the costumes, every single second of the film I was aware I was watching a Wes Anderson film.
Anderson’s distinctive style is omnipresent – From the dialogue to the set decoration to the costumes, every single second of the film I was aware I was watching a friggin’ Wes Anderson film.  Seriously, dude, get over yourself and get out of the way of the story.
Anderson’s distinctive style is omnipresent – I’m not completely uncouth.  Anderson’s tweer-than-thou direction was occasionally effective.  I particularly liked the playful absurdity of the phone calls between Bruce Willis/Ed Norton and both Sam’s adopted father and Social Services.

At its heart, the film’s love story is rather sweet – Not that the tale of two misfit adolescents in love is anything new, but there’s something charming about the somehow both incredibly adult and childlike way the two main characters go off together.
But let’s not go overboard – Obviously, I prefer my Wes Anderson in as a constrained, small dose as possible (assuming “not at all” isn’t an option).  To me, everything after the pair was found in their tent was gratingly messy.
OK, OK, I see the point That said, thinking about the film as I’m doing this write up has made me realize Anderson’s trademark precocious kids were kinda effective here in making an “Up with kids, down with adults” argument (or, if you prefer, lamenting the increasing complexity of issues one faces as one gets older) as each of the kids seemingly had things figured out, while all of the adults had significant problems they couldn’t work out.

The film had a rather impressive cast – I believe they combine for something like 2 Oscar wins for acting and additional 4 nominations.   Plus, I have respect for whoever convinced Bruce Willis to do the film, because he really does have the chops to do more than be an action star.
Were they any good? – Honestly, the Wes Andersoness of it all was too overwhelming for me to get a sense of whether I liked the actors in any of their roles.
It could only be Jared – The actor who played Sam is Jared Gilman.  As a fellow Jared, I gotta represent.

If the movie were a sandwich, it would be: A cucumber sandwich with pastel-colored bread

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